Friday, October 8, 2010

Stalking the wild mushroom

You have got to click on each one of these pictures to truly enjoy, the uniqueness, the individuality of these various wild mushrooms.
I will identify, the ones I can.



Puffballs on a decaying log





What the heck is this? Must get closer...



Giant Puffball!
Wearing sunglasses for perspective.This specimen of Giant Puffball, compared to the first picture, well, there is no comparison. The first puffballs are just tiny balls, not even as big as a ping pong ball. The Giant Puffball is way bigger then a persons head, perhaps twice as large. Rather a bizarre sight to see at the base of a tree.


Chicken of the Woods



Amanita Mascaria



Indigo Lactarius
This mushroom was really interesting, when broken open and exposed to air, it looked as if it had blue ink in it.



A different colour of Amanita Mascaria




Wild Oyster Mushrooms on a fallen tree

Picked and enjoyed eating lots of these mushrooms prepared with pasta, then with chicken and rice, then finally, cream of mushroom soup!




NO, it is not a rose. Isn't it amazing how it resembles a rose blossom.
But, it is an Oyster Mushroom.



Wishing you, a beautiful day :)

9 comments:

  1. Rainy autumns THE time for wild mushrooms....mmm mmm good!

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  2. Nice one Penny. These are lovely photos! I always have a bit of trouble identifying wild mushrooms as they seem to change appearance a lot depending on the weather conditions and if you are going to eat them it's not the sort of thing you want to get wrong.

    The blue in the AM is very alarming and who would have thought that puffballs were so sensitive to sunlight that they have evolved sunglasses, that really is very canny of them.

    Have a good weekend!

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  3. Peter! We were out looking today, and we'll be out on the hunt later this weekend.

    I enjoy the experience immensely!

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  4. Thanks John!

    We jokingly say "All mushrooms are edible.....once"

    We try to stay with basics oysters, morels, chantarelles.

    We identify very carefully. (Because we have about 20 different guides to check, check and check again) When in doubt.

    The blue mushroom on the inside, is even a bluish grey on the outside, really a different mushroom. It is an indigo lactarius. And it is edible.

    "wild mushrooms as they seem to change appearance a lot depending on the weather conditions"

    This is true at least as far as Oyster Mushrooms, the pics we got of their first "flush" they were quite white, but, the second flush of them, soon to be on the way, looks as if it will be more beige.
    We shall soon see..

    "who would have thought that puffballs were so sensitive to sunlight that they have evolved sunglasses, that really is very canny of them"

    Well they really must protect their retinas, cataracts and all ;)

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  5. Hi Penny. Oh yes, I see that I read the wrong caption to the mushroom. I thought I was rubbish at identifying them, this goes to prove it.

    Surprising that the indigo lactarius is edible (more than once) blue is such an odd colour for food. We have chantarelles up in the woods here, I might try some of those. I think I can recognise them.I hope so anyway.

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  6. thank you Penny that was very cool!

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  7. Hey John, had the chantarelles one time, and they were quite good!

    Over the weekend, we found another puffball, fresher then the one in the pic, so we ate some of it.

    It is like cutting a marshmallow.
    Pure white inside, sliced it and grilled it, next day thinner slices, breaded and fried with egg.

    It was pretty good, rather like tofu. Not really mushroomy tasting, quite mild.

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  8. AP, glad you enjoyed the pics :)

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  9. Yum! that sounds lovely penny.

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