Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Russia commits to Ukraine bonds and slashes gas prices and more......

Definitely a beneficial agreement for the Ukrainian people


Russia will invest $15 billion from one of its sovereign wealth funds in Ukrainian government securities and cut the price of natural gas it charges its neighbour by about a third, President Vladimir Putin said.

Economic relief for Ukraine ... Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, and his Ukrainian counterpart Viktor Yanukovych, left, react after signing an agreement in Moscow on Tuesday.

"Considering the problems of the Ukrainian economy linked to the world financial crisis, and to support the budget of the Ukrainian government, the Russian government decided to place part of its reserves from the National Wellbeing Fund in Ukrainian state securities," Putin said today during a joint briefing in Moscow with Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych.

Under an agreement signed between the chiefs of OAO Gazprom and Ukraine's state energy company Naftogaz, the price of Russian gas will be cut to $268.5 per 1000 cubic metres from about $400, Putin said.

Ukraine's leader sealed the agreements with Putin as his country is gripped by the biggest rallies in almost a decade after Yanukovych's decision to pull out of a trade agreement with the European Union. Ukraine is struggling with its third recession since 2008 and foreign-currency reserves at a seven-year low.

The nation of 45 million is a key transit land for pipelines taking Russian gas to western Europe. Ukraine's membership in a Russian-led customs union with Belarus and Kazakhstan wasn't discussed with Yanukovych, Putin said.

The yield on Ukraine's 2014 dollar bond tumbled 369 basis points, or 3.69 percentage points, to 11.5 per cent, the lowest since October 18. Five-year credit-default swaps fell 27 basis points to 1043.35.

Ukraine will issue a total of $15 billion of Eurobonds that Russia will buy, including a tranche that will be placed this year, Russian Finance Minister Anton Siluanov told reporters in Moscow.

"Yanukovych has finally got what he wanted," said Vladimir Osakovskiy, the Moscow-based chief economist for Russia at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. "Cheap gas, cash and no Customs Union commitments. I guess this takes EU association out of the table for now. This might give a boost to protests, but with no Customs Union membership this should be OK."
 The initial reason/excuses for the protests were because of a desire to join the EU. Allegedly.
At this time it seems more likely that the western backed protestors were going for an overthrow.

If you missed an extremely thoughtful comment left by Arevordi, it is posted below
Greetings Penny,

Great job as always.

There is one thing about Ukraine that I want to mention, as an addendum to your work here. I doing so, however, the last thing I want to do is come across pro-West or pro-EU. You know where I stand on this matters.

Because of its history, Ukraine is essentially a deeply divided state with two relatively distinct nations living within one political body: the nation is more-or-less half west-leaning (primarily Ukrainian Orthodox, Catholic and Jewish) and half east-leaning (primarily Russian Orthodox) - if not by actual faith then by heritage. The western half of the country identifies more with Poles, Moldovans, and Slovaks than with Russians. Ukraine is also a nation that has had terrible troubles with Bolsheviks: Many millions dead during the infamous famine. There was also the harsh treatment of western Ukrainians by Stalin's Moscow during and in the aftermath of the Second World War due to their collaboration with Nazi Germany.

As a result, hate for their Russian neighbors runs deep for many in the western half of the Ukraine. It is these people we are seeing protesting on the streets. I personally think their EU drive is rooted more in their hate for Russians than in their love for the EU.

Unfortunately, within the mindsets of the Ukrainian sheeple today (as well as sheeple around the world), no differentiation is made between the Bolshevik regime and ethnic Russians. For hundreds of millions of people around the world: Bolshevism/communism = Russian. Therefore, for many in the Ukraine, ethnic Russians (Orthodox Christian Slavs) are the enemy - never mind that Bolshevism was imported into Russia to destroy the Russian Empire, never mind that Russian Slavs suffered just as terribly as Ukrainians. Moreover, Ukraine is a European country that physically shares a border with the European Union.

The aforementioned sociopolitical factors are what Western powers are exploiting today in their geostrategic drive to expand NATO into historically recognized Russian territories via the multinational theme-park known as the European Union.

Consequently, Ukraine has been diligently worked on by a very wide array of Western led and funded operatives, political activists, rights advocates, feminist movements, gay movements, NGOs, news press, etc, for two full two decades. The Jewish factor also looms large in the country.
Why is the Ukraine so important for the West?

As Zbigniew Brzezinski pointed out, Russia is enormously more powerful with the territory of Ukraine within its fold and considerably weakened without it. In short, Western powers want to secure their Slavic buffer states (Poland and Ukraine) as a way of creating defensive depth against Russia, as well as a way of containing and/or weakening the Russian state - historically viewed by Western powers (in this case American, British, French and German) as their number one geopolitical competitor on the global stage.

In a sense, this Western push into eastern Europe can be likened to a new "Operation Barbarossa", without all the guns.

Nevertheless, the situation in the Ukraine is very serious. The country has turned into a volatile powder keg. I'm glad Kiev and Moscow have taken a step back in trying to defuse the situation.

My main concern is that Western powers are attempting to foment large scale civil unrest within this deeply divided country. This runs the risk of a bloody and lengthy civil war, to which Moscow may respond to by annexing the strategic Crimea (which is actually a real contingency plan for the Kremlin). I personally want to see the Crimea going back to Russia but Moscow will do that only as a last resort (that is if Kiev is on the verge of a major split).

Therefore, Kiev and Moscow need to be very careful with the way they are handling these protests. The best course for Ukrainian and Russian officials to take would be to do what they are doing now: take a step back and allow these protests to run their natural course, all the while keeping tight control over the situation and monitoring the country's Western funded NGOs, activists and news organizations. There should not be disproportionate use of violence against the protesters themselves. An overreaction by the authorities is what Western powers are actually hoping for.

Anyway, the main point I want to leave you with is that Ukraine is a deeply divided nation that currently runs the risk of civil war and an eventual split. A split is not desirable. But if it happens, I want to see Russia annexing the Crimea.
Thank You Arevordi  who keeps us all informed at Heralding the Rise of Russia-Geopolitics & more


One last item. An interview that should have been here last week. But, better late then not at all.

Progressive Radio News Hour – Rick Rozoff – 12/06/13

Rozoff is an activist, anti-war supporter, Stop NATO web site editor.
He “document(s) and oppose(s) global militarist trends and an expanding theater of war that began” by balkanizing Yugoslavia in the 1990s.
The Ukraine is discussed.

14 comments:

  1. who exactly are the opposition ?

    On the recent visit of Republican Senator John McCain to Ukraine. The US (CIA) repossessed the Bandera movement, the predecessor of the current pro-EU and pro-NATO Ukrainian neo-Nazi party Svoboda (Freedom), from the Nazis after World War II. In May 2007, outgoing Ukrainian President (installed in power through the Orange Revolution) Yushchenko awarded Roman Shukhevych with the title “Hero of Ukraine.” Besides being anti-Russian and anti-communist, Shukhevych also held the SS rank of Hauptsturmfuhrer in World War II, bestowed on him by the German Nazi regime. On January 22, a few days before leaving the office of President, Yushchenko also gave the Hero of Ukraine title to Stepan Bandera. Bandera was the leader of the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA) created in 1942 by anti-Russian and anti-communist Ukranian nationalists under the aegis of the Nazi occupiers. Under Yushchenko and his light of “hope,” streets in several cities were named after Bandera, and a monument was erected in Lvov. In December 2010, the New York Times reported the release of the U.S. National Archives’ study,
    etc
    https://www.facebook.com/vladimir.suchan/posts/10151834503263388

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  2. Adra syria massacre: eyewitness tell
    http://rt.com/news/adra-syria-massacre-witnesses-355/

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  3. Syria, Al-Jaafari: The Game of Chemical Weapons Is Over, no more secret who is behind it.

    Syria's permanent representative to the UN Dr. Bashar Al-Jafaari press conference
    Following UN session on chemical weapons in Syria, He called for pressuring the governing regimes of Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Turkey to cease funding, supporting and providing facilitations to the terrorist groups which are committing barbaric massacres against civilians in Syria.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SpncVZe1uZQ&app=desktop

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  4. the neonazis dont have it all their own way

    pro-Ukraine pro-Yanukovich rallies to counter the neonazi US backed ones
    http://www.itv.com/news/update/2013-12-14/thousands-of-ukrainians-stage-rival-rallies-in-kiev/?

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  5. double standards?

    President Obama names openly gay retired tennis star Billie Jean King to the US delegation for the Sochi Winter Olympic games.
    The delegation to the opening ceremonies will not include the president, first lady or the vice president, all who headed the previous four Olympic delegations, or a cabinet secretary, only a former one.
    This marks the first Olympics since the 2000 Sydney Summer Games that a US president, vice president, first lady or former president has not been a member of the delegation for the opening ceremony, which will be Feb. 7 in Sochi. - USA TODAY
    Read more: http://www.ksdk.com/story/sports/2013/12/17/obama-sochi-glbt-delegation-billie-jean-king/4076417/

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    Replies
    1. i meant to add this
      'Sinha quoted the latest Supreme Court judgement to say that gay sex was illegal in India and diplomats with same-sex partners should be prosecuted.' will US boycott India as its trying to do with russias Sochi olympics? or will real politik triumph?
      http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2013/12/us-moves-assuage-india-over-envoy-arrest-2013121855833430205.html

      to show US hypocrisy and that they are using the gay issue to attack Putin

      Delete
  6. Thank you for the honor, Penny.

    To reply to the point you raised in my blog: People don't normally wake up one day and simply decide to take to the streets en masse. For a mass political protest to take place in a hotly contested nation you need a motivation, a well organized network of activists and of course high level individuals capable of pulling financial and political strings. The motivation in Kiev is clearly there, I briefly described the deep rooted anti-Russian sentiments of many Ukrainian nationalists and liberals. The organizers in Kiev are there, a not so little army of Western funded and led NGOs, independent journalists, rights advocates, political activists, clergymen and government officials. And we also know that there are high level policymakers in various power centers around the world that would love to drive a permanent wedge between Ukraine and Russia for purely geostrategic reasons. These are the factors that are taking the sheeple to the streets in Kiev. These are the factors that can start a civil war or attempt a coup 'if' the movement's organizers, masterminds and financiers conclude that the reaction from Moscow will be weak or something that they can afford to risk. In other words, if the ringleaders of these protests are made to fear a serious Russian reprisal, they may not be foolish enough incite large scale violence or seek a forceful overthrow of the government in Kiev. Therefore, much is riding on how Moscow handles this situation. As I previously mentioned, Moscow is doing the right thing by taking a step back and trying to defuse the situation. However, in addition to Moscow's soft approach vis-à-vis Kiev, Russian officials need to begin posturing aggressively against Western interests elsewhere to divert attention.

    Like I said, this is a new Operation Barbarossa: I can only hope that Russian officials are busy planning their new Operation Bagration.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Arevordi

      It seems it is time for me to read up on Operation Barbarossa.
      Heard of it, but, more in passing.
      Perhaps I should post something about it for background info?

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    2. You don't need to. Operation Barbarossa was only the code name of the German invasion of the USSR in 1941. What OP meant, was that what we witness now in Ukraine, is the same thing but with other means. Invasion of Russia, bit by bit/

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    3. Hi gallier deux!

      :)

      I did take some time to read about OB, not much, but some
      And yes it was the code name for the German invasion of Russia during ww2
      What I did read made me think about the parallel between a Germany that controlled most of Europe then- except for England
      And a Germany that controls/bullies most of Europe via the EU bank dominance now- except for England, again.
      And the German led, most recent attempt, via pro EU protestors
      While the players may have changed albeit superficially the agenda is still the same...

      Delete
  7. For others who may wonder what comment Arevordi is responding to
    I am highly suspicious that the demonstrators were hoping to overthrow the government of the Ukraine.... this was not just 'protests' out of the blue
    This was a plan, an attempt to overthrow and then proceed from there


    Ukraine's PM says he sees "all the signs of a coup" as protests intensify.

    Mykola Azarov said the government was aware of plans to seize the parliament building in the capital Kiev.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-25192792

    I don't doubt there was a coup planned.

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  8. Ukraine Orange Maidan
    http://voiceofrussia.com/news/2013_12_15/Russian-lawmaker-warns-Ukraine-about-Orange-Maidan-2596/

    Sort of like the Russians calling out the August Syria attack allegedly in heated exchange

    Serbia starts its journey into the EU in January - note the DSK connection re no IMF program and Russia bank board seat
    http://www.rferl.org/content/serbia-eu-accession-talks/25204157.html

    US minuteman III launch
    http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/minuteman-test-missile-launches-california-21245325

    Russia relaunching rail based nukes after deploying missiles to the west
    http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/world/2013-12/18/c_125881299.htm


    China-US ship tussle juxtaposed against China banning GMO Corn imports while the US arrests China nationals on alleged seed IP theft...

    China also bans bitcoin...



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  9. Forbes befuddled: a black US president or russias independent leader" which is the lesser evil to be crowned Number 1?

    Forbes wouldnt try to lead people by framing he persons addressed, would they?

    so here is how they describe Putin and Obama

    'Who’s more powerful: the autocratic leader of a former superpower or the handcuffed commander in chief of the most dominant country in the world?'

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/carolinehoward/2013/10/30/the-worlds-most-powerful-people-2013/?utm_campaign=forbestwittersf&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social

    Putin autocratic? Obama handcuffed? hancuffed by whom?

    or a strong capable independent leader, who brought his country back from the brink of extinction, who knows how to lead, and an other who seems to prefer to defer to shadowy figures behind the scenes...

    is how that could be rephrased.

    Autocracy is what you can detect in Forbes itself, in its effortrs to control our view of Putin and Obama

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