Wednesday, November 11, 2020

UPDATED! Insider Trading? Pfizer’s Covid Vaccine "Efficacy" Hoopla vs Real World Effectiveness- No Mink Culls

Limited data released. None of it reviewed prior to all the hoopla

talk or writing that is designed to get people excited about and interested in something
Efficacy is not real world efficiency.

"...Efficacy is the performance of a treatment under ideal and controlled circumstances, and effectiveness is performance under real-world conditions," Stamataki said.   

Global News

According to Pfizer, participants were tested only if they developed symptoms, leaving unanswered whether vaccinated people could get infected but show no symptoms and unknowingly spread the virus.

Infection control epidemiologist Colin Furness, an assistant professor at the University of Toronto, said there is still a lot of data that needs to be reviewed.

“I would like to know whether or not it was a mild case of coronavirus,” he said. “All of this data should be released, such as the demographics, who got sick, and obviously what the side effects of the vaccine are. Pfizer needs to be very transparent about this.”

The data has yet to be peer-reviewed or published in a medical journal. Pfizer said it would do so once it has results from the entire trial.
    
‘Cautiously optimistic’

Although the data is promising, Bowman said it’s best that everyone remains “cautiously optimistic” as there are still a lot of unknowns.

“We have to be quite cautious. We are looking at public relations from a pharmaceutical company whose primary goal is marketing and profit,” he said. “I am not saying I don’t believe it, but you have to realize that the full data has not been released. They are telling us what the data says, so experts still need to review it.”

I'm going to repeat the above bold, highlighted statement: 

“We have to be quite cautious. We are looking at public relations from a pharmaceutical company whose primary goal is marketing and profit,

 UPDATE: Clearly all the hoopla about the efficacy of the Pfizer vaccine is just that-  “hoopla” ( see above for definition) But it did make for great spin, right? And gave the stock market a huge boost.

 Not only did the hoopla make for great spin- It made for great profits! As you will read below:

  • Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla sold 62% of his stock in the company on the same day the drugmaker announced the results of its COVID-19 vaccine trial.
  • Bourla sold $5.6 million in stock on Monday as part of a predetermined trading plan adopted August 19. (This pre determined trading plan was, in my opinion, the impetus for the release of the useless vaccine data and all the hoopla)
  • His stock sale was carried out at $41.94 a share. The 52-week-high for Pfizer stock is $41.99, which means the CEO cashed out his shares at close to their highest price this year.
CTV Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla filed to sell millions of dollars of his company's stock Monday -- the day the pharmaceutical giant announced positive data about its coronnavirus vaccine.

Let's re-read the quote below just one more time, after reading about Pfizer's CEO raking in the profits.

“We have to be quite cautious. We are looking at public relations from a pharmaceutical company whose primary goal is marketing and profit,

Let that sink in, okay?


 

In the FEAR mongering department, there was a sensational episode of fear programming, replaying everywhere.For the express and explicit purpose of terrorizing the populace. That was the  alleged need for a mass mink culling necessary because allegedly some “mutated coronavirus” and it's alleged danger of spreading to humans? The culling didn’t take place. It didn’t need to. Spreading the fear virus was all that mattered and that worked very well

I've gathered some facts from a few reports:

The Hill- Denmark Shelves Plans to Cull Up to 17 million mink

The Danish government has paused plans to mandate culling of the country’s entire mink population

Viruses naturally mutate, and scientists have observed minor mutations in the new novel coronavirus, but none that have affected its ability to spread or cause disease in any significant way.

Members of Parliament argued the Danish government cannot legally order the mass culling and refused to pass legislation that would authorize the order.

“There are huge doubts relating to whether the planned cull was based on an adequate scientific basis,” Jakob Ellemann-Jensen, leader of the opposition Liberals, said, according to Bloomberg. “At the same time, one’s depriving a lot of people of their livelihoods.”

Denmark pauses plans to cull minks

Washington Post: Denmark stops mink cull

From earlier today:

 

10 comments:

  1. "...“There are huge doubts relating to whether the planned cull was based on an adequate scientific basis..."

    I've been following this "culling" phenomena for decades...ever since I noticed the very regular "culling" of chickens on poultry farms. They always say it's because of some disease...but it's in fact always a market decision...to keep the prices up. Too many minks? The price of fur goes down. Response: Kill minks and blame it on a "disease" for the sake of the animal rights folks.

    gc

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey GC:
      They didn't cull the minks- They literally had no reason to do so- The whole fairy tale- when it was making the rounds was for no other reason other then to spread fear about a mutating virus= booga booga

      Delete
  2. I've updated this post with some interesting information.
    On the day Pfizer broke it's "news" to the world, Pfizer's CEO sold 62 percent of his stocks raking in a nice profit for himself

    Insider trading? Oh yah. That's my opinion

    ReplyDelete
  3. I can find justification for keeping animals for food production (don't buy into the BS of solely crop production, the only stable way economically, environmentally, long term etc. to farm is mixed livestock/crop production) but I cannot find any reason to farm animals for the demands of the luxury fashion market. They are held usually in conditions very far from "species" appropriate.

    If you want warm clothing - get down-filled clothing. Ducks and geese taste good and the feathers have superior qualities in insulation.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wool too! We just bought a wool comforter - very happy with the choice.

      I was surprised when I first saw the article about minks. I was under the impression from years of PETA terrorism that no one wore mink anymore. Who is wearing mink?

      Delete
  4. Hi Peterm and Gwen:

    I've no idea who wears mink? Assuming it's people with a ton of money- which is not me.

    As for warmth we have a feather duvet and yes it's very warm but lightweight. So feather is great for insulation.

    Wool. I'm a huge fan of wool socks- merino wool in particular
    They are expensive, but, I've pairs of sock that are more then 10 years old. I wear them year round- summer and winter
    my feet are kept warm or cool and moisture wicking is great
    Worth every penny!



    ReplyDelete
  5. The Moderna board of directors and a few others also sold a lot of their shares when the price skyrocketed. Run with the money as they say.
    As for the Minks. What they will try to do is con everyone into vaccinating all animals. They tried this with the dogs and cats to make people afraid of them too. I would be guessing the animal market for covid vaccines would be worth a few trillion dollars to drug companies. Anything for money as they say,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hadn't thought of that angle.Covid vaccines for your pet.
      Anything for the money, indeed.

      sorry for the tardy response :(

      Delete
  6. maybe you are aware the Israel hospitals have ordered 2 million of the Sputnik Russian vaccine, so what is good for the goose is good for us Goyim, oops i meant gander

    ReplyDelete

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